Professor Thomas Henzinger, 2015 Milner Award winner and President of the Institute of Science and Technology, Austria

Professor Thomas Henzinger, 2015 Milner Award winner and President of the Institute of Science and Technology, Austria

Many of us will have seen pictures or videos of pilots sat in a cockpit full of buttons and levers, but have you ever wondered how pushing just a few buttons can have any effect on such a large vessel as an aeroplane? Or how about what happens when you press the brake pedal in your car? In his upcoming lecture, Professor Thomas Henzinger, the Royal Society 2015 Milner Award winner and President of the Institute of Science and Technology, Austria, will discuss the systems behind the buttons and levers in aircraft and the brake pedal in our cars, systems collectively known as ‘reactive systems’.

Reactive systems are increasingly becoming part of our daily lives, now found in car braking systems and entertainment systems to name just a few. With many of these systems playing crucial roles we need to be sure we can rely on them. Computer scientists such as Professor Henzinger have developed powerful mathematical models, theories and tools for investigating and predicting the behaviour of these reactive systems to ensure their reliability. In his talk Professor Henzinger will cover the importance of these systems and why understanding the maths behind these is so important to our day-to-day activities.

This talk will also consider how computer science may be more relevant to biological science than one may think. For example, do you know what an aeroplane, a car and a living organism such as a cell have in common? Join us at the Royal Society on Wednesday 18 November to find out.

To learn about this and more visit the Royal Society on Wednesday 18 November for the 2015 Milner Award Lecture by Professor Thomas Henzinger. This event is free to attend, doors open at 6pm ready for the start of the lecture at 6.30pm.